January 12, 2009

Know where your child is via GPS

For years, parents have been limited to traditional methods of keeping track of their children’s movements: standing in the playground, watching from the window, or asking them to phone home when they visit a friend’s house. But now anxious mothers and fathers are being offered a distinctly hi-tech method of monitoring their child’s every movement – tracking them by satellite.

Launched this week at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, the Num8 watch from British company Lok8u is said to be the first tracking device specifically designed to help parents keep tabs on wayward offspring.

Full story

November 20, 2008

Living Without A Heart

US teen lives 118 days without heart

An American teen-ager survived for nearly four months without a heart, kept alive by a custom-built artificial blood-pumping device, until she was able to have a heart transplant, doctors in Miami said on Wednesday.

The doctors said they knew of another case in which an adult had been kept alive in Germany for nine months without a heart but said they believed this was the first time a child had survived in this manner for so long.

Full story

– Ravi Jayagopal
RavisRants.com

February 6, 2008

Your Drinking Habits Could Influence Your Kids

“There is little question that parental behaviors influence adolescent alcohol use,” added Michael Windle, Rollins Professor and chair of the department of behavioral sciences and health education at Emory University….

Researchers examined data from 4,731 adolescents (2,402 males, 2,329 females) and their parents (87% with data from both parents, 13% with data from only one parent), gathered through an ongoing Finnish population-based, developmental twin study of health-related behaviors and correlated risk factors. Parents were asked about their frequencies of alcohol use and intoxication, as well as their lifetime prevalence of alcohol-related problems. Adolescents reported on perceptions of the parenting that they received, as well as their own prevalence of alcohol use and intoxication at 14 and 17.5 years of age.

Full story: Parental Drinking And Parenting Practices Influence Adolescent Drinking

Your Drinking Habits Could Influence Your Kids

“There is little question that parental behaviors influence adolescent alcohol use,” added Michael Windle, Rollins Professor and chair of the department of behavioral sciences and health education at Emory University….

Researchers examined data from 4,731 adolescents (2,402 males, 2,329 females) and their parents (87% with data from both parents, 13% with data from only one parent), gathered through an ongoing Finnish population-based, developmental twin study of health-related behaviors and correlated risk factors. Parents were asked about their frequencies of alcohol use and intoxication, as well as their lifetime prevalence of alcohol-related problems. Adolescents reported on perceptions of the parenting that they received, as well as their own prevalence of alcohol use and intoxication at 14 and 17.5 years of age.

Full story: Parental Drinking And Parenting Practices Influence Adolescent Drinking

January 3, 2008

Medical Myths – like ‘Dim light ruins eyesight’

Researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine made a list of common medical beliefs espoused by physicians and the general public. They included statements they had heard endorsed by doctors on multiple occasions. The result is a seven-item list of medical and health myths that are widely repeated by doctors and in the media, all of which either aren’t true or lack scientific evidence to support them.

Here’s the summary:

  1. People should drink at least eight glasses of water a day
  2. We use only 10 percent of our brains
  3. Hair and fingernails continue to grow after death
  4. Shaving hair causes it to grow back faster, darker or coarser
  5. Reading in dim light ruins your eyesight
  6. Eating turkey makes people especially drowsy
  7. Cell phones create considerable electromagnetic interference in hospitals

See the full story here: ‘Dim light ruins eyesight’ and other medical myths