January 26, 2009

Sharing Bed With Infants A Bad Idea

The rate of accidental suffocation deaths among babies increased fourfold over the past two decades, according to a new study, despite a national campaign to encourage safe infant sleeping.

Authors of the study, which appears today in the journal Pediatrics, say the nationwide increase probably is the result of more thorough investigations and changes in how deaths are classified. Nevertheless, the researchers and local medical experts said the figures reflect a continuing problem and highlight concerns about whether babies should sleep in the same beds as their parents or siblings.

“These deaths are likely preventable,” said Carrie K. Shapiro-Mendoza, an epidemiologist at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and lead author of the study. “So this problem is ongoing, and we should not divert our attention. … We need an infusion of more efforts to make them reduce further.”

Researchers have long studied Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, a term that refers to infant deaths that cannot be explained after a medical investigation. Shapiro-Mendoza’s study sought to find out if a newer, more specific category of infant death – by strangulation or suffocation – was increasing.

Full story: Don’t share bed with infant, parents told

January 22, 2009

Ottawa boy’s invention to protect birds from crashing into windows

Eighth grader Charlie Sobcov wants to stop birds from dying in collisions with windows, but he doesn’t want to ruin anybody’s view.

For his latest school science fair project he has invented painted, plastic decals that can be placed — discreetly — right in the middle of a window pane.

“This paint is a colour that birds can see but humans can’t,” he said Wednesday on CBC Radio’s All in a Day. “It’s like putting a big stop sign in the middle of the window.”

The colour is ultraviolet, beyond the range of colours visible to humans. That means the “stop sign” lets birds know the window is solid, but is nearly invisible to humans.

Full story: Ottawa boy’s invisible invention warns birds about deadly window

January 15, 2009

Teach Your Child How To Lose Gracefully

How many times have you heard, “It’s a tie!”, “Everyone wins!”, and “You’re all winners!”? We have good intentions of not wanting to hurt children’s feelings, but are we really helping them in the long run?

This is the second in a series, “C’mon Parents!”, which tackles tough issues that parents are griping about. Some of my ‘mom friends’ and I were recently talking about this issue and wondering how it will impact our kids in the future. We basically have 5 major gripes with telling all kids they are winners.

Full story

January 8, 2009

Parenting doesn’t get easier just because you’re rich

Guess what? If you are rich, you could probably afford to hire more household help. But at the end of the day, unless you are a terrible parent who will let your nannies raise your kids, you still have to deal with them.

“The marriage is experiencing frustrations because of the added stress of the twins (11-month-old Max and Emme),” a close source revealed. “But they will work things out. They love each other, and that will dictate what happens. I don’t think divorce is in the picture.”

Full story

January 6, 2009

Naming Your Baby After a Holiday?

Is It Cheesy to Name Your Baby After a Holiday If Your Due Date is December 25?

New York, NY (PRWEB) December 24, 2008 — As long as the name you choose for your baby feels like a celebration for his or her arrival, it’s fine to go ahead and tap your favorite holiday, according to an article posted today online at BabyZone.com, a website that serves the needs of expectant and new moms.

“Holidays like Christmas offer copious options to new parents who haven’t yet decided what to name their baby,” says Suelain Moy, baby name expert and author of the book, Names to Grow On, in the Q&A, “Is It Cheesy to Name Your Baby After a Holiday?“.

Holidays like Christmas offer copious options to new parents who haven’t yet decided what to name their baby

According to the feature posted on BabyZone, Natalie, Natalia, and Natasha all mean “born on Christmas Day.” Noel, Noelle, and Navidad simply mean “Christmas.” Many December babies have been named Nicholas (after St. Nick), Claus (after Santa), or Kris (after Mr. Kringle). Other festive names include Joy, Holly, and Yule.

However, be aware when making first and last name combinations.

Consider the case of the 90 or so women in the U.S. whose legal name is Mary Christmas. While Utah-based, stay-at-home mom, Mary Christmas (nee Young) admits that her name is a big hit during the holidays, she does encounter her share of doubting Thomases.

“I’ve had to show people my license a couple of times,” she said to BabyZone. And when her name shows up on the caller ID or on a package, some folks think it’s a prank.

Still, it’s hard to find fault with a name that brings people so much joy and happiness. “People think it’s fun,” Mrs. Christmas said (good-naturedly) to BabyZone. “It’s positive. It’s a conversation piece.” And, as her husband likes to point out, he gets to celebrate with Mary Christmas, not just on December 25, but all year long.