July 31, 2007

A Father’s Worst Nightmare Comes True (Almost)

Got this amazing piece forwarded by a friend. Very smart story, but it will hit you on various levels if you are a father, and more importantly if you have a daughter (I do – 8 year old!). – Ravi Jayagopal.


“A father passing by his teenage daughter’s bedroom was astonished to see the bed was nicely made and everything was neat and tidy. Then he saw an envelope propped up on the centre of the pillow. It was addressed “Dad”. With the worst premonition, he opened the envelope and read the letter:

Dear Dad,

It is with great regret & sorrow that I’m writing you, but I’m
leaving home.I had to elope with my new boyfriend Randy because
I wanted to avoid a scene with Mom & you. I’ve been finding real passion
with Randy & he is so nice to me. I know when you meet him you’ll like him
too -even with all his piercing, tattoos, & motorcycle clothes.

But it’s not only the passion Dad, I’m pregnant & Randy said
that he wants me to have the kid & that we’ll be very happy
together. Even though Randy is much older than me
(anyway,40 isnt so old these days is it?),& has no money,
really these things shouldn’t stand in the way of our relationship,
don’t you agree?

Randy has a great CD collection; he already owns a trailer in the woods
& has a stack of firewood for the whole winter. It’s true he has
other girlfrnds as well but I know he’ll be faithful to me in his own
way. Randy taught me that marijuana doesn’t really hurt anyone and he’ll
be growing it for us and we’ll trade it with our friends for all
the cocaine and ecstasy we want.

In the meantime, we’ll pray that science will find a cure for AIDS
so Randy can get better; he sure deserves it!!

Don’t worry Dad, I’m 15 years old now and I know
how to take care of myself. Someday I’m sure we’ll be back
to visit so you can get to know your grandchildren.

Your loving daughter,
Rosie

At the bottom of the page were the letters ‘PTO’
Hands trembling, her father turned the sheet, and read:

PS: Dad, none of the above is true. I’m over at the
neighbour’s house.I just wanted to remind you that there are worse
things in life than my report card that’s in my desk centre drawer.
Please sign it and call when it is safe for me
to come home. I love you !!

June 28, 2007

‘Momblocked’ mothers feel edged out by dads

“While I never thought that I would end up staying home with Sarah, I knew that I was fully capable of doing so,” says Brian Metz, McClure-Metz’s husband.

But almost four years into it, McClure-Metz began to feel her husband was maybe too capable. He had become more competent and assertive in the child-care arena and it showed in small ways. Metz took over when his wife struggled with the car seat, or put the kibosh on plans when he thought their daughter needed down time.

Full story: ‘Momblocked’ mothers feel edged out by dads

June 16, 2007

Dad’s New Favorite Pastime: Digital Pictures

(ARA) – Face it: Dads and technological gadgetry go together like barbecues and the month of June. And, when you add digital photos to the mix, the fit’s an even better one.

Just ask Derek Whiteside, a 33 year-old father of two daughters, Alice, who just turned two, and six-month old Helen. An entrepreneur at heart, Whiteside spent the last five years establishing and managing a boutique beer and wine shop that he recently sold.

So, as he ponders his next business adventure — likely something service oriented he says — in addition to caring for two young daughters, he fills his time by using his PC to enjoy all kinds of entertainment, especially digital photography.

I have a sassy new computer in the living room,” Whiteside says proudly.

But in the Whiteside household, the PC does way more than serve as a gateway to the Internet and a repository for spreadsheets and other documents: powered by Microsoft’s latest operating system, Windows Vista, Whiteside’s computer is his family’s photography nerve center.

Using a Canon Powershot digital camera, Whiteside has rendered the shoeboxes full of photos stacked on closet shelves as relevant as the rotary telephone. “We’ve been comfortable with digital photography since before the girls were born,” he says. Drawing on Windows Vista, he uses the PC to organize photos in several ways — by the month they were taken, for example, or by subject matter – and shares photos with family and friends across the nation via email. One of Whiteside’s more noteworthy recipients of his photographs is his 87 year-old grandmother, who recently bought a computer.

Whiteside also enjoys the ability to edit his photos instantly, resizing, for example, and eliminating red-eye shots.

“One of the great things about Windows Vista is that it has functionality for photography, music and home theater built into the system,” Whiteside says. “Having an operating system that can do those kinds of things easily is very nice.”

And, he adds, the entire operation is integrated into the living room. “There are no wires showing,” he says. “It looks pretty. It has a lot of polish.”

Finally, Whiteside is wading into the world of video chatting, following the lead of his sister-in-law’s family. “They’re into it,” he says. “It’s a really fun thing to do and only requires a Web cam, which is pretty affordable. It’s sort of like the Jetsons.”

For more information on Microsoft Windows Vista, click here

Courtesy of ARAcontent

June 11, 2007

Keep an eye on your kids – ALWAYS!

When accidents happen to a child, it is almost always the fault of the parent(s).

See video for proof. It is not the child’s fault – it is the idiotic parent (or caregiver) who is responsible.

January 26, 2007

Teenagers and dads – The “Teens Don’t Like Adults” Myth

As a father of two teenage daughters (15 and 17) I have continually heard the comment that goes something along the lines of “Whoa, that’s a tough age. I guess you’ll get to talk to them again in six years!”

I have also run into numerous dads (moms too) that say, “Yeah, my kids don’t even want to be around me these days. They are so into their friends.”

The first comment is a myth. The second is a cop out.

Granted, teenagers want their independence, but they still want their parents in their lives. More on this later.

What I believe happens is that parents get intimidated and busy and stop taking the time to ask children simple, conversational questions about their lives.

Nothing can be more intimidating than walking into a room of seven teenagers talking about music or anything, and feeling completely outnumbered, out-cultured, and out of sorts. It is easier to walk away than say, “What’s going on?” It is easier to walk away than ask that new pimply-faced boy you haven’t seen before, “Where do you go to school? “How are the grades going? Where did you go to middle school?” This starts the dialogue. Walk into the teenage fray we must. Take a deep breath, walk in, and ask away!

Let’s face it: we parents are human beings too. And half the time these kid’s parents have stopped talking to them and their teachers are basically time police. You may be the first adult who has asked them a considered question in the last month. People, even teenagers, love to talk about themselves. So if you give them half a chance they will. You can become an oasis of freedom to talk about themselves. This goes for your own children as well. It doesn’t have to be an interrogation. Just a question about school, about a friend, about music. You don’t have to be cool or “in the know.” “Who is that group? Are they popular?” You don’t have to know that Eminem is back with Kim. The key, I believe, is to not give up on the initial push back – or non-push back in the case of teenagers. They won’t be forthcoming. They won’t answer. They may shrug and say “Oh, nothing.” But believe me they want to talk. They are dying to talk. Even if they don’t.

Some how to’s:

1. Be the house they can come to. Let kids gather at your house. Anytime.

2. Food. Have lots of food. Kids (especially boys) love food. Don’t take, “I’m not hungry,” for an answer. Teenagers are always hungry. Food is the lubricant for talk.

3. Don’t be judgmental. I am not saying to let them have drugs in your house. But don’t let the disapproval of a little tattoo or funky hair on your kids friends show on your face.

4. In and out. Don’t hover. Come in, ask a few questions. Then get out. Let them breath.

5. Rules are OK. I like to keep them reciprocal. I respect you. You respect me is my favorite. I don’t talk to you that way, you don’t talk to me that way.

One last word on kids wanting you in their lives: Have you ever met a thirty year old that said, “I sure wish my parents hadn’t been in my life when I was a teenager.” I haven’t. Mostly we hear the opposite. Kids might be confused, they might even be angry. They may even be embarrassed by you – but then again everyone’s parents are an embarrassment. But, you are like the old best friend that you haven’t seen in ten years. Even though they would never tell you, your kids want to see you and most importantly, talk to you.

“Teens Don’t Like Adults” is a Myth. Don’t buy into it.

For more assistance on dad teen relations, please visit: http://www.greatdad.com
Author is an expert author for kids related advices. You can contact anytime for kids or parenting related issues.
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